Nov 15, 2019  
2014-2015 Academic Catalogue 
    
2014-2015 Academic Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses of Instruction


Course Numbering System. Each subject is identified by a symbol made up of two parts. The first part is an abbreviation denoting the field of study. The second part is a number denoting the particular subject. The first digit indicates the year in which the course is taken and, therefore, the level of instruction.

Credit. The unit of academic credit used at the Virginia Military Institute is the semester hour. A semester hour represents one hour of classroom work (lecture or recitation) or one period (two or three hours) of laboratory or supervised research or field work per week during a single semester. Thus a course that meets for three class hours and one laboratory period each week during one semester usually carries credit for four semester hours.

In the following course descriptions the figures on the title lines indicate, in order, the class hours per week, the laboratory or field work hours per week, and the semester hours credit. For example, the figures “3—2—4” mean that the class meets three times a week for one-hour classroom sessions and has two hours of laboratory, supervised research, or field work each week, and that the course carries four semester hours of credit.

 

ECONOMICS

Department of Economics and Business
Department Head: Colonel Moreschi

Requirements for a major in economics and business are specified in Economics and Business .

Note: For all economics and business majors, the following courses must be completed with a grade of C or higher: MA 125 , MA 126 ; ERH 101 , ERH 102 ; EC 201 , EC 202 , EC 300 , EC 303 , EC 304 , EC 330 ; BU 210 , BU 211 , BU 220 , BU 230 , BU 310 BU 316 BU 330 , BU 339 , BU 440 . In addition, a minimum grade point average of at least a C must be earned in all department courses.

   •  EC 407 - U.S. Economic History
   •  EC 408 - Development of Economic Thought
   •  EC 409 - Labor Economics
   •  EC 410 - Government and Business
   •  EC 412 - Managerial Economics
   •  EC 414 - Applied Game Theory
   •  EC 415 - Political Economy of Conflict
   •  EC 421 - Quantitative Applications in Econ & Business
   •  EC 422 - Industrial Organization
   •  EC 425 - Sports Economics
   •  EC 425 - The Economics of Sports
   •  EC 430 - Financial Modeling
   •  EC 435WX - Institutions and Economic Development
   •  EC 450 - Topics in Economics
   •  EC 451 - Topics in Economics
   •  EC 460 - Independent Research in Economics
   •  EC 461 - Independent Research in Economics
   •  EC 470 - Honors Research in Economics
   •  EC 480 - Economics Internship
   •  EC 481 - Economics Internship

EDUCATION

Coordinator:   Lieutenant Colonel Elaine Humphrey.

   •  ED 200 - Foundations of Education
   •  ED 201 - Practicum for Foundations of Education

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Department Head: Colonel Addington

Requirements for a major in electrical and computer engineering are specified in Electrical and Computer Engineering .

   •  EE 111-115 - Introductory Modules in ECE
   •  EE 122 - DC Circuits
   •  EE 129 - Introduction to Digital Logic Circuits
   •  EE 221 - Discrete Mathematics
   •  EE 223 - Electrical Circuit Analysis
   •  EE 225 - Electromagnetic Fields
   •  EE 228 - Digital Systems Design
   •  EE 230 - Signal and System Analysis
   •  EE 240 - C Programming
   •  EE 242 - C++ and Object Oriented Programming
   •  EE 255 - Electronics
   •  EE 321X - Systems Design I
   •  EE 328 - Computer Architecture
   •  EE 339 - Microcontrollers
   •  EE 351 - Electrical Circuits and Machines
   •  EE 352 - Electronic Devices
   •  EE 356 - Electronic Applications and Interfacing
   •  EE 372W - Electronic Communications
   •  EE 381 - Automatic Control Systems
   •  EE 413 - Microelectronics
   •  EE 420 - Green Energy Power Conditioning
   •  EE 422 - Systems Design II
   •  EE 426 - Semiconductor Devices
   •  EE 431 - Digital Signal Processing
   •  EE 435 - Fault Tolerant Computing
   •  EE 445 - Computer Networks
   •  EE 450 - Biomedical Signal Processing and Biomechanics
   •  EE 455 - Electrical/Mechanical Design
   •  EE 460 - Portable Power
   •  EE 469 - ECE Internship for Credit
   •  EE 470 - Seminar
   •  EE 471W - System Design Validation
   •  EE 473 - Selected Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
   •  EE 491-496 - Undergraduate Research in ECE

ENGLISH, RHETORIC, AND HUMANISTIC STUDIES

Department of English, Rhetoric, and Humanistic Studies
Department Head: Colonel Miller

Requirements for a major in English are specified in English, Rhetoric, and Humanistic Studies .

Note: A minimum grade of C in ERH 101  , WR 101, or EN 101 is a prerequisite for ERH 102  , and a minimum grade of C in ERH 102  , WR 102, or EN 102 is a prerequisite for all 200- and 300-level English, Rhetoric, and Humanistic Studies courses. All 400-level courses have additional prerequisites, which are listed in the course descriptions or provided in registration materials. These prerequisites may be waived by the department head if there is evidence that the cadet is well prepared for the 400-level course. 

200-level courses:  These courses build on research-informed writing skills developed in ERH 102 - Writing and Rhetoric II . Major writing assignments are typically 1000 words each, totaling at least 2000 words, and emphasizing close reading, synthesis of ideas, and guided use of sources.

300-level courses:  Intermediate courses stressing critical reading of more complex works and research-informed writing. Major writing assignments are typically 1500 words each, totaling at least 3000 words, and emphasizing analysis. Assignments require cadets to demonstrate some originality of thought.

400-level courses:  Advanced courses requiring more independent work, substantial reading assignments, writing totaling 400 words, and typically a major course project.

   •  ERH 101 - Writing and Rhetoric I
   •  ERH 102 - Writing and Rhetoric II
   •  ERH 103 - Fundamentals of Public Speaking
   •  ERH 201 - Rhetorical Traditions I
   •  ERH 202 - Rhetorical Traditions II
   •  ERH 203 - Ways of Reading
   •  ERH 204 - The Language of Art
   •  ERH 205 - British Literary Traditions
   •  ERH 206 - American Literary Traditions
   •  ERH 207 - Ethics
   •  ERH 211 - Comparative Religion
   •  ERH 212 - Ancient Greek and Medieval Philosophy
   •  ERH 213 - Modern and Contemporary Philosophy
   •  ERH 214 - Introduction to Music
   •  ERH 215 - History of Art I
   •  ERH 216 - History of Art II
   •  ERH 217 - Film and Performance Studies
   •  ERH 221 - Digital Rhetorics
   •  ERH 222 - Genre Studies - Poetry
   •  ERH 223 - Genre Studies - Fiction
   •  ERH 224 - Genre Studies - Nonfiction
   •  ERH 225 - Visual Arts Studio
   •  ERH 230 - Artistic Responses to Social and Political Issues
   •  ERH 240 - Poverty and Human Capability
   •  ERH 250 - Teaching Writing
   •  ERH 301 - Rhetoric and Public Address
   •  ERH 302 - Civic Discourse
   •  ERH 303 - Cultural Rhetorics
   •  ERH 304 - Language and Style
   •  ERH 311-313 - Professional Writing (Discipline/Field Specific)
   •  ERH 314 - Technical Communication
   •  ERH 321 - British Literature in Cultural Context
   •  ERH 322 - American Literature in Cultural Context
   •  ERH 323 - Philosophy and Literature
   •  ERH 331 - Aesthetics
   •  ERH 332 - Logic and Critical Thinking
   •  ERH 341 - Contemporary Art Since 1945
   •  ERH 352 - Practicum
   •  ERH 361-362 - Independent Study
   •  ERH 370-379 - Studies in Art and Culture
   •  ERH 411 - Field Work
   •  ERH 421 - One Text
   •  ERH 422 - Major Figures
   •  ERH 461-462 - Independent Study
 

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